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Are You Straight Like a Jalebi?

March 17, 2013
Jalebi Ka Jawaab Nahin

Jalebi – Indian Mithai with an artistic touch to it

There are only a few food preparations which define a personality trait as good as “Woh to Jalebi Ki Tarahan Seedha Hai (He is straight like a Jalebi) does. A Jalebi looks simple and yet is complex in character. Its complexity of course has to do with its distinct shape, but it equally to do with its way of cooking. It goes like this that even great chefs find it difficult to figure out how Jalebi gets its sweetness and crispiness at the same time. There is of course an art to it and that is the fun part.

Jalebis comes in two distinct varieties: Thin and very crispy, thick and juicy. Both varieties have a huge fan following and committed generations of Jalebi makers, especially in the “old city” areas of Delhi, Lucknow, Amritsar and Lahore in Pakistan. Jalebi and Malai,  Jalebi and Rabri and Jalebi and Dhoodh are some of the all time favorite combinations. The challenge is that once you start eating, you can’t stop. Till the mid 80′s, Jalebis were only fried in Desi Ghee and many still insist that Jalebis fried in vegetable oil or refined oil can’t be treated at par in taste with Desi Ghee Jalebis.

For me, I have reduced my intake of Jalebis to once a month, but I enjoy my 4-5 Desi Ghee  Ki Jalebis only, somehow I don’t get that punch and flavor with refined oil ones. Make your own choice, relish your jalebis and remain safe from those who are straight like Jalebis. Enjoy!


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For 26 years I have been doing what I want to. I know I have been lucky. I don't beat around the bush. Not too much into networking. Hate those who push connections over merit. Love traveling. Quality or Quantity still puzzle me at times. Haven't turned into anything other than being me, neither have an intent to. Prefer living in present or future, but a lifelong student of history. A father. A husband. A brother. A friend. A colleague. An Indian. A Sikh. A Punjabi And above all a Dilli-walah.

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