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Lodi Garden: The Garden From Another Era

Athpula bridge at Lodi Garden
Athpula bridge at Lodi Garden
National Bonsai Park near the entrance of Lodi Garden
National Bonsai Park near the entrance of Lodi Garden
A couple admiring Bada-Gumbad building at Lodi Garden
A couple admiring Bada-Gumbad building at Lodi Garden
Interior of Bada-Gumbad Mosque at Lodi Garden
Interior of Bada-Gumbad Mosque at Lodi Garden
Bright blossoms outside Sheesh Gumbad, Lodi Garden
Bright blossoms outside Sheesh Gumbad, Lodi Garden
Rose garden inside Lodi Garden
Rose garden inside Lodi Garden
Swans cooling in the lake at Lodi Garden
Swans cooling in the lake at Lodi Garden
Water Harvest system installed at Lodi Garden
Water Harvest system installed at Lodi Garden
Sikandar Tomb at Lodi Garden
Sikandar Tomb at Lodi Garden
Mohammed Shah's Tomb at Lodi Garden
Mohammed Shah's Tomb at Lodi Garden
Sun bathed corridor at Mohammed Shah's Tomb, Lodi Garden
Sun bathed corridor at Mohammed Shah's Tomb, Lodi Garden

Spread over an area of 90 acres, Lodi Garden was home to one of Delhi’s oldest dynasty, the Lodi. Now, the green garden is home to more than 30 species of birds and many plants. Lodi garden is nicely tucked away from the chaos of the city. Flanked on one side by khan market and Safdarjung's Tomb on another side, it injects life into the mundane concrete jungle.

The spacious lawn not far from the entrance leads to a big monument called Bada Gumbad and the Bada Gumbad Mosque. Measuring 27 m in height Bada Gumbad is believed to have been used as an entrance. The interior is quite plain. The Bada Gumbad Mosque has inscriptions dating back to 1494. The interior design is a fine example of incised and painted limestone plaster used during the Lodi period. Sheesh Gumbad also known as the glass dome got its name from the glazed blue ceramic tiles used to cover the top half.

 

 

It is an enigmatic place. Entering the garden is like opening a door to a 16th century world. One can't help but think of how this might have been at its prime. The slope spreads into vast greenery a little further from Sheesh Gumbad. But beneath the lush Carpet of grass lies the remains and crumples of many civilization, buried in time. This place was once the powerhouse of the Lodi dynasty and it was inhabited till 1936, before they were relocated for creating the garden. But Monuments like the Sikandar Tomb and Mohammed Shah’s Tomb have survived the rubs of time in good condition.

Yoga practitioners and health enthusiast flocked the garden in the morning. At noon people came here just to be at peace with nature or to share a simple lunch. As I walk down the little slope from Sheesh Gumbad I saw an affectionate sight of three laborer friends bonding over some Parathas and closely guarded by their bicycles.

At the lake, lovers flocked to watch swans paddling away in gaggle. It is one of the nicest spot to get your pictures taken. Some more adventurous folks dipped their feet in the water to cool themselves from the heat. At the end of the lake is the famous Athpula Bridge built during Akbar’s reign. Of all the monuments in the garden this one was the last to be built. It is a joy to watch the lake from the bridge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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