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Reiek Hill

A footpath that leads up to the Reiek peak
A footpath that leads up to the Reiek peak
A footpath that leads up to the Reiek peak
A footpath that leads up to the Reiek peak
Reiek village is 35kms from Aizawl
Reiek village is 35kms from Aizawl
Reiek Tourist Resort
Reiek Tourist Resort
A road towards Reiek peak
A road towards Reiek peak
A cave like rock extension stretch above the road towards Reiek Peak
A cave like rock extension stretch above the road towards Reiek Peak
A jeep can pass under the rock that hovers over the road at Reiek
A jeep can pass under the rock that hovers over the road at Reiek
First view of Reiek mountain after walking 45 minutes on foot
First view of Reiek mountain after walking 45 minutes on foot
A bench installed at Reiek mountain
A bench installed at Reiek mountain
Virgin forest on Reiek mountain with the backdrop of Reiek village
Virgin forest on Reiek mountain with the backdrop of Reiek village
View of Aizawl from Reiek Mountain
View of Aizawl from Reiek Mountain
The virgin forest at Reiek Mountain have been preserved from the times of the Mizo Chiefs
The virgin forest at Reiek Mountain have been preserved from the times of the Mizo Chiefs
A view tower at the peak of Reiek Mountain
A view tower at the peak of Reiek Mountain
View of the steep slope covered with grasses at Reiek Mountain facing the sunset
View of the steep slope covered with grasses at Reiek Mountain facing the sunset
A stone protruding out of the Reiek peak where goddess Khawluahlali was said to have sat mourning for her daughter Ngaiteii
A stone protruding out of the Reiek peak where goddess Khawluahlali was said to have sat mourning for her daughter Ngaiteii
A path on the edge of Reiek Mountain leading towards the peak
A path on the edge of Reiek Mountain leading towards the peak

The Reiek Hill is one of the highest in North Mizoram. It is around 35 kms from Aizawl. After driving for half an hour, we passed Tlawng River - one of the longest rivers in Mizoram. Huge amount of water gets pumped up from the river to Aizawl. The road climbs up again through the forest before reaching the lovely Reiek village at an elevation of 1,548 metres, and beneath the foothills of Reiek mountains.

The taxi stopped at a junction. Before I could do anything, I spotted a small hotel that served fried rice with some soup. After having a good meal, I asked a local for direction to the Reiek peak. She was surprised and wanted to know why I was going there. She told me it would take 2 hours on foot. After thanking her, I headed for the Reiek Tourist Resort a few minutes walk from the town.

As a matter of fact, I was not intimidated by long walks. I wanted to walk as long as I could walk up and walk down before sunset. It was already 2:00 pm. At the Reiek Tourist Lodge, I asked the caretaker - a man my age about Reiek Hill. He said it was around just 4-5 kms from the Tourist Resort and around 45 min-1hr walk depending on the walk. I decided to go at once.

The road to Reiek peak is a trekkers' delight. It meanders up through thick forest, enchanted with the songs of birds. You don't hear so many birds at the same time. It is a heaven for bird watchers. The thick forests surrounding the peak are few of the virgin forests that have remained from the time of the Sailoh chiefs. They are considered sacred.

A motorable road leads up to a giant rock that stretch out like the roof of a stadium. The forest was quiet except for the renting of songbirds. After a good 45 minute-walk up from the beautiful forest, I reached the peak. It was a sharp contrast to the beautiful forest. The rocky mountain peak ends bluntly into a sharp cliff as if someone had chopped off the head. There is the green forest on one side and the steep rocky cliff with yellow grasses on the other. But it gives a good view of the surrounding hills. Steps are built along the edge of the hill for easier climbing.

Apart from the peak with the viewing tower, there's also a white bench overlooking the sunset and the mountains. From here the forest looked pristine. The Reiek village looked surrounded by a sea of green forest. Strong winds blew from the cliff and ruffled the golden grasses. From here, you could see the quiet city of Aizawl.

Like most interesting places, there's a folklore associated with Reiek Hill. According to the folklore Van Indona or War of the Heavens was fought here. The spirit of Reiek Hill was goddess Khawluahlali. She had a daughter named Ngaiteii, who was beautiful. The goddess ruled the place and her subjects and lived happily until the demon spirit of Tlawng River interfered to flow southwards through the Reiek Hill and Lungdar. Goddess Khawluahlali wouldn't allow and since she was superior, the demon of Tlawng River conceded defeat. While goddess  Khawluahlali and her subjects were busy celebrating the demon spirits of Chhawripial Tlang located on the west of Reiek mounted a surprise attack.

The Reiek spirits transformed themselves into falcons and a fierce battle was fought in the air. The Reiek spirits triumphed upon the aggressors but their joy was marred by the death of Khawluahlali's daughter, Ngaiteii. The goddess went into mourning. She would sit on the rock protruding at the peak, facing the sunset and reminiscing her daughter. Every place in the hill is steeped in myth and dented with folklore.

How to Reach Reiek:

There are taxis going daily to Reiek from Khatla. The last taxi leaves at 12 noon. Ask the locals for direction.

Where to Stay:The Reik Tourist Resort at the base of the hill and just above the Reiek village is a beautiful place, worth visiting for itself. Room charges begins from Rs.500 onwards.

Other Tourist Attractions:

-A Typical Mizo Village near the tourist resort.

-Anthurium Fest organized annually at Reiek, every 2nd weekend of September.

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