Hyderabad Flyovers



A flyover is a bridge, road, railway or any similar formation that navigates across another road or railway. It is a type of road which carries a greater capacity in comparison to the lower road. However, the formation which allows the lower capacity road to pass through the greater capacity road is called an underpass. Capacity of a flyover is established on the number of lanes allotted to travel and the estimated traffic count.

Flyovers are made to end the woes of distressed daily commuters who get stuck in traffic jams almost on everyday basis. Like other cities, Hyderabad also experience traffic congestion. To ease the traffic blockage in the city, Hyderabad government has constructed flyovers and underpasses.

List of Hyderabad flyovers
  • YMCA - Secunderabad Flyover

  • CTO- Secunderabad Flyover

  • PNT Flyover

  • Begumpet Flyover

  • Greenlands Flyover

  • Panjagutta Flyover

  • Basheerbagh Flyover

  • Narayanguda Flyover

  • Telugu Talli Junction

  • Khairatabad Flyover

  • Dabeerpura Flyover

  • Tarnaka Flyover

  • Jamia Osmania Flyover

  • Nalgonda X Roads Flyover

  • Chandrayangutta Flyover

  • Masab Tank Flyover
List of Flyovers under Construction in Hyderabad
  • Express Highway: Mehdipatnam to Aramghar

  • Langer House
Longest Flyover in Hyderabad

Hyderabad has recently registered its name in the book of records for having the longest flyover in the nation. The P V Narasimha Rao Elevated Expressway was constructed in the time span of 3 years and was opened for the public on 19th October, 2009. It is 11.6 km long and costed Rs 450 crores to the HMDA (Hyderabad Metropolitan Development Authority).

The advantage of the flyover is the speedy and uninterrupted connectivity it offers between Hyderabad and Shamshabad Airport. It stretches from Masab Tank in Hyderabad to Aramghar Junction on Hyderabad-Bangalore Highway.

The flyover has unhindered power supply, as requested by the state's electricity department, since the traffic moves at a greater velocity on it. However, the 2-Wheelers and 3-Wheelers are not permitted on the flyover.

Noteworthy Flyover in Hyderabad

A peculiar flyover with a length of 2.1 kilometres was inaugurated in Hyderabad on July 13, 2008. It is made of 503 solid blocs, each weighing 40 metric tones. Interestingly, these concrete blocs were constructed in Miyapur, which is around 16 kms away from the flyover. The 2.1 km flyover is built on 40 pillars shaped like a flower wedge, with a distance of 30 metres each. It was constructed at a total cost of Rs 30 crore and has eased the traffic problems of thousands of commuters traveling from Banjara hills to Begumpet on regular basis.



Last Updated on : 19/08/2013






     


     

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